Hallmark Under Fire Again

Hallmark Under Fire Again

When Hallmark announced their new movie line-up for 2020 they once again were chastised by LGBTQ advocates for not having any LGBTQ stories, characters or plotlines in their productions. Hallmark had previously aired a same-sex wedding in a commercial in December 2019 which resulted in a protest of the channel by a conservative group called One Million Moms.

Hallmark yanked the commercial, then reinstated it after a few days of getting scorched on social media.

After dismissing and replacing their CEO, Hallmark has just announced they will develop LGBTQ movies to include in their Christmas content.

One Million Moms is on offense again. One Million Moms posted a petition stating that “so many people feel betrayed by Hallmark over these past seven months,” claiming that families can’t watch “without being bombarded by politically correct commercials and the LGBTQ agenda.” The post goes to cite a verse from the Bible and list what One Million Moms will be boycotting in reaction to Hallmark exploring LGBTQ storylines, characters, and actors: Hallmark Channel, Hallmark wrapping paper, greeting cards, and Christmas ornaments.

For now, Hallmark appears to be holding their ground. One executive released a statement say, “Diversity and inclusion is a top priority for us and we look forward to making some exciting programming announcements in the coming months, including announcements about projects featuring LGBTQ storylines, characters, and actors. We are committed to creating a Hallmark experience where everyone feels welcome.”

Obviously, One Million Moms (or less or more, depending on who you ask) do not feel included. According to the One Million Moms website, the organization began to “give moms an impact with the decision-makers and let them know we are upset with the messages they are sending our children and the values (or lack of them) they are pushing.”

It will be interesting to see how Hallmark intended to deal with this situation. They are bound to be bullied by either side.

Hallmark as a lock on Christmas television, with their endless productions of schmaltzy Christmas movies earning them hundreds of millions of dollars a year. So a lot is at stake with this situation.

Indiana Town Cowers from Bullying ACLU

Indiana Town Cowers from Bullying ACLU

It is a familiar Christmas story in America: a community adopts a symbol of the season — a Nativity, a tree or something similar — then the city gets threatened. Fearing a costly public battle city officials quickly give in. This time it is Knightstown, Indiana and the symbol is a cross atop a city Christmas tree. The ALCU calls that “establishment of a state religion”.

According to several media reports Knightstown resident Joseph Tompkins argues that the Christian symbol on display in the Knightstown town square violates the First Amendment. The lawsuit is seeking for removal of the cross, monetary damages and declaration that the cross display violates the First Amendment.

Tompkins, and the ACLU, agree that the cross is offensive and “forcing” religion on those who don’t want it. What they want is money and to force EVERYONE in Knightstown to believe as Tompkins believes. In essence, if this case is won by the ACLU Knighstown will be forced to be atheist.

Nobody will see it that way, of course.

The community has responded as you would expect. Crosses are suddenly everywhere.

But this will end as it always ends. The cross comes down. There will be no court case. And yet another sad chapter in misreading the Constitution will be written.

The suit says Tompkins “is forced to come into direct and unwelcome contact” with the cross on top of the tree as he drives through town. This, the suit says, has caused him “irreparable harm,” which can only be remedied by taking the cross down and paying Tompkins monetary damages.

The only “irreparable harm” comes from an elected City council that won’t stand up for itself and for the people it represents. They should counter sue for damages caused by all the publicity and take it to the ACLU. Hit them where they live — in the pocketbook.

It’s the American way.

Atheist Hijacks Festivus to Mock Nativity and Trump

Atheist Hijacks Festivus to Mock Nativity and Trump

There he goes again. Famed anti-everything Chaz Stevens has once again erected a Festivus pole opposite a Nativity scene in Deerfield Beach, Florida.

Normally he has that pole firmly parked up his backside but he drags it out every Christmas, er, Festivus, to air his grievances.

And what grievances they are. He replaces that pole with one serious weed.

He hates religious freedom, you see. He hates people who believe in God, peace, love and hope. And he wants to wrestle control over these things. He won’t stop at banning.

We wrote about him first in 2012, when he pitched a fit as he lost a case to get the Nativity scene off city property in Deerfield Beach.

Deciding to join the fray with the construction of his own “holiday” display, Stevens selected Festivus — an imaginary holiday born of the television show, Seinfeld — and put up a humble pole made of beer cans.

The media just ate it up and gave Stevens all the publicity he wanted. He brought his beer cans back in 2013.

He’s been back every year and each year the media darling gets such a big stage on the likes of CNN that he paints more absurdity into his “protest”.

Last year, just to rankle Christians, his Festivus pole was themed gay, in order to support the LGBT movement. Forget the fact that nobody has a problem with gays celebrating either Christmas or Festivus.

Stevens point was to mock, no matter how absurd his display made his statement.

Christmas is evidently okay with Stevens because he perpetually uses Christmas-themed stuff on his pole, which is technically a violation of the tenets of Festivusim. The pole isn’t supposed to have any decoration because it’s “too distracting”.

This year the barber-pole design includes a tip of the hat — literally — to Donald Trump. Stevens has filed for a permit to burn it down at some point (a modern Yule log?).

Nothing is sacred to Stevens and he resents what is sacred to others.

He tramples and mocks the beliefs of others in order to pursue a political agenda that includes religious suppression, militant atheism, and a host of radical issues that includes embracing Satanism (which makes no sense when one advocates atheism but common sense seems to be far from Stevens’ agenda).

His goal is to erect Festivus poles in all fifty state capitols.

You see, his fight to get a Nativity scene removed in Florida backfired. Instead of removing the scene he was told to put up his own holiday display. He was told to embrace the principle of liberty he wants to deny everyone else: he was told to express his free speech, to exercise the freedom of HIS religion.

And he does that year after year. His religion is mockery, denial and darkness.

With each passing season Stevens showcases his bitter monument to suppressing the ideas of others.

His display, his actions and his words showcase that he’s anti-peace, anti-love, anti-Christ, anti-goodwill.

He wants to take your religion — any religion — and put it in a box where it isn’t seen or isn’t heard.

It won’t be allowed.

He wants, in his circular thinking, to make HIS religion everyone’s religion. He believes in nothing and that is what he wants to impose on everyone.

Think about it. If he is successful in suppressing all religion only HIS religion will be the one acknowledged.

Atheism is a convenient cloak. It is a broad umbrella which is used by political activists to hide behind. Don’t be fooled by this.

Stevens likely is no atheist. We doubt he gives much thought at all to things spiritual, which many true atheists do.

If he did, his actions would not support the attack on those who believe differently than him.

Stevens wants several things in his quest, and little of them have to do with Christmas.

He wants a society where all are held to one standard — his standard. By force.

He wants religion removed from the public discourse entirely.

That means not only no Christmas but also no churches.

And if there are churches he wants them taxed and regulated.

The State decides everything. The State is Omnipotent. He wants devotion only to the State.

He desires a State that engineers everything — from sexuality to medical care to population control to private property ownership.

Chaz Stevens is not about rights. He’s not about beer cans or burning poles to defy Trump. He’s certainly not about Christmas. He’s about force and denial of the human spirit.

The way to combat this is to allow Stevens to put up his pole year after year.

Let the contrast show between his darkness and the light of truth found in Christmas.

And let the media fawn over him. Applaud his right to mock, jeer and pronounce what you believe to be silly, profane and idiotic. By his fruits he will be known.

And if he does burn that pole I say we all show up. Bring marshmallows. Or chestnuts.

He’s using Christmas. He is using atheism. He is using Festivus.

He is even using Satanism (he wanted to pray to Satan in order to stop prayers from being said at civic events and it worked).

Chaz Stevens is a user who will stop at nothing to control your first amendment rights. That’s what his pole is all about.

Florida Family Fights City Hall and Wins

Florida Family Fights City Hall and Wins

They Hyatt family of Plantation, Florida fought off a lawsuit by the city against their Christmas display — and won. The famous display of more than 200,000 Christmas lights has been in and out of the news for several Christmas seasons as the City of Plantation, Florida has tussled with them over traffic and disruption to their neighborhood.

The acrimonious relationship spilled over into the media and soon it became a David-vs-Goliath story as the mayor personally became involved in the dispute.

As local police force and traffic measures were put in place to help deal with the crowds costs escalated for the city. Seeing no recourse, they first fined the Hyatt family and then sued them in court for creating a public nuisance.

Today the court said the Hyatt’s could continue their display — and that the city will just have to deal with it.

The Hyatts have thousands of supporters, both inside and outside of the city limits but none of this patches things up with the neighbors. One neighbor right across the street has moved just to get away from the mess the display creates every December.

According to local media reports the city failed to prove the Hyatts were bothering anyone. They didn’t present a single neighbor to testify against them nor proof the event increased trash or traffic in the area.

Texas County Votes Against Atheist Christmas Display

Texas County Votes Against Atheist Christmas Display

A county in Texas denied a petition from an atheist group who wanted to place their own banner next to a Nativity scene at the county courthouse there at Christmas.

The banner was displayed in the courtroom before discussion started.

It read, from top to bottom, the Facebook symbol, then “/KerrvilleFreeThought, Happy Winter Solstice, At this season of the Winter Solstice, we celebrate the Birth of the Unconquered Sun – the TRUE reason for the season. As Americans, let us also honor the birth of our Bill of Rights, which reminds us there can be no freedom OF religion, without freedom FROM religion in government. Freedom From Religion Foundation, FFRF.org.

Pastor Greg Young of Kerrville asked to speak at the start of the regular meeting as he had a live radio show to broadcast at 11 a.m. and commissioners agreed.

Young said FFRF “preys upon small communities like Kerrville” saying the organization’s founder “has absolute disdain for Christianity.” He told a story to say allowing this one request would lead to multiple unwanted actions in the future, eventually pushing out current beliefs and values.

About 200 people were in the district courtroom, standing room only, by 11:20 a.m. when commissioners moved upstairs. Pollard had about a dozen speaker forms, offered one more chance for those, warned he expected order in the room, then called on Whitsett.

In case attendees hadn’t seen the photo of this banner in the agenda packet, Pollard helped Whitsett unroll and display it; and again said Whitsett asked to display the banner, and didn’t ask to block the Nativity scene.

Whitsett said, “I ask only that this banner be put up, and I would rather the other Manger Scene be put up, too. I think Christmas is a fine time to celebrate our Bill of Rights which was ratified near that season,” adding the FFRF Facebook page invites atheists and agnostics to take part in discussions. “We only want equal treatment,” Whitsett said.

The audience was mostly quiet, with a few audible “Amens” and supporting short comments. Every speaker opposed Whitsett’s request, and was applauded by the crowd.

Pam Wood called FFRF perhaps new to Kerrville but known elsewhere as an anti-religion group. She cited a definition of “free thinkers” by that group, saying they specifically mention Christians and Jews, making their argument for freedom from religion “disingenuous.” “They want a refusal because it suits their beliefs and allows them to go to court.”

Kenny Bledsoe said he’s a church-goer, and if this banner was allowed, it would be a foot in the door to Christianity in general for the FFRF. “They have the right to worship as they please, but I am opposed to putting this banner anywhere in Kerr County.”

Pastor Del Way of Calvary Temple Church said, “The problem is, they claim freedom from religion, but they want to do it on our holiday. I oppose this, especially on the courthouse square. We believe they are trying to take over our religion.” Way said he had more than 1,000 signatures on petitions from his church, and told Whitsett, “Leave us alone. Get your own holiday.”

John Hammack said America has been a nation under God since Columbus arrived; and asked commissioners “not to let some pagan atheist take Christ out of Christmas,” historically set Dec. 25.
Patricia Carson declared her faith in Jesus, and said it’s His birthday that’s celebrated. “If these other people want a special day, they need to get another special day.”

Starting with Buster Baldwin, commissioners said they are representative of citizens in their precincts, and hired to take care of citizens’ business. “That’s why there’s a ‘no’ vote from me,” Baldwin said.

One by one, Tom Moser, Judge Tom Pollard, Jonathan Letz and Bob Reeves said they agreed. Moser suggested the actual winter solstice Dec. 21 might be a better date, and protests from the audience were quickly quieted. Commissioners voted 5-0 to deny Whitsell’s request.