Brace for the Charges of Racism in Christmas

Three years ago we mothballed this site declaring victory in the war on the war on Christmas with this simple statement. We hold to that statement.

It was never about Christmas in the first place. It was about religion and your right to practice it. Christmas is, for many, a means of practicing their religion.

We stopped our part in it all because it appeared people were starting to get it. Besides, the war on Christmas is depressing. Nearly everyone on all sides of it are weary of it. Nobody wants to really talk about it.

Well, we were wrong.

We re-open our site now because it is clear a whole new battle is coming to Christmas. As usual, it will distort truth. It will label Christmas enthusiasts unfairly. It will discriminate against the religious.

It has to do with racism. That will be the new rallying cry in the War on Christmas.

Literally, if you love Christmas, if you celebrate it, you will likely be labeled racist.

But there is, as there always is, some truth to what they will be saying. Christmas, like so many other things, DOES have a problem with racism.

~ Examples of Racism in Christmas ~

Zwarte Piet or Black Pete – The Dutch tradition of Black Peter, a helper of the Dutch St. Nicholas, has for nearly two centuries been celebrated in Dutch culture. But a seemingly black man shown in shackles has long rankled activists in Europe and has thrown annual holiday traditions into sharply divided debate.

Charlie Brown Thanksgiving/Christmas – In 2018 social media critics pointed out that Franklin, an African American child in the animated holiday specials of Charlie Brown, had to sit alone at the Thanksgiving table, a sign of racism in the works of Charles Schulz.

Confederate Christmas – The American South has celebrated Christmas perhaps longer than any other region in the United States. Frequently, their decorations are garnished with the colors and designs of the Confederate flag. Many online retailers sell millions of dollars of these decorations each year. The Confederate Christmas has also been celebrated in parades with people dressed in Confederate uniforms and carrying Confederate flags in memorials to ancestors who fought for the South. In recent years such displays have been condemned as racist.

Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer – In the decades since Rudolph rose to near Santa-like prominence in popular Christmas culture it wasn’t until 2018 that critics began to call his story “problematic” at best and “racist” at worst. The outcry in 2018 was that his story is a parable on racism, homophobia and bigotry.

White Christmas – The seemingly totally secular Christmas movie, White Christmas, references the white vaudeville tradition of black-faced performers in minstrel shows. Somehow how this makes both the movie and the song White Christmas racist.

Do They Know Its Christmas? – An 80s Christmas song intended for charitable purposes is now called racist.

Jingle Bells – A Boston University professor says the song Jingle Bells, which never once even mentions Christmas, has its origins as a minstrel number and is thus racist.

A Christmas Story – with references to Italians to the accents of servers in a Chinese restaurant on Christmas Day, many cry that this Christmas classic movie is full of racism

The Dolls in Disney’s Santa’s Workshop (1932) – A classic Disney Christmas cartoon of the 1930s is full of racism

Disney’s Night Before Christmas (1933) – Santa goes to a home of poor children that all have to sleep in one bed. After chasing Santa up the chimney one kid dances around in blackface.

Dr. Seuss Racist – The Grinch is green and everyone else is white. That somehow makes Dr. Seuss racist.

Big Crosby AbrahamRacism in Holiday Inn – The 1942 movie about holidays features Bing Crosby singing in blackface while celebrating the birthday of Abraham Lincoln.

It’s a Wonderful Life – The maid of the Bailey family in It’s a Wonderful Life. That’s just one layer of racism found in this #1 rated movie of all time.

Hallmark Christmas Movies – The “unbearable whiteness” of Hallmark holiday movies

~ Does Christmas Need to Change? ~

Of course Christmas needs to change. We all need to change.

The current discussions of racism – absent of the violence and the needless destruction of monuments and history – are important. Real change begins with honest discussion.

But with that change comes the hard cold fact that we can change NOTHING of the past.

How we deal with the past needs to be very carefully considered.

Does Bing Crosby singing in blackface prevent us from listening to Bing Crosby Christmas music at all? Does celebrating the tradition of an elf-like helper to the Dutch Santa make one racist now?

It is interesting to note that from the examples listed above ALL of them are from secular elements of Christmas.

But our prediction will be that the extreme activists of our time will twist the celebration of Christmas as an attack on the religious USING the types of secular racism we see above. In other words, if you celebrate Christmas at all for whatever reason – especially for religious reasons – you’re a racist. That is what’s coming.

We do note, with some sense of irony, that these debates of Christmas are not new at all.

The famed schism in the Church of England in the 1600s was all about how secular excesses had overtaken the spiritual observance in the Church and that Christmas then had to be banned.

We never seem to get anywhere in this War on Christmas, do we?

We believe the selective censorship we’re seeing in today’s civil unrest with the wrongful destruction of monuments and the outrageous banning of things like the word “antebellum” or “Dixie” will bleed into the season of Christmas.

That’s why we’re back. It’s about to become absurd once again.

One thought on “Brace for the Charges of Racism in Christmas

  • June 17, 2020 at 10:38 am
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    I can’t take much more of this stuff. To make actions of the past a crime against present people or practices is the height of idiocy. Maybe we need to do a little more teaching like my mother told me, “Sticks and stones may break my bones but words will never hurt me.”

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