Nevada High School Bans Merry Christmas

The Nevada community of Mesquite is embroiled in controversy after a local high school principal admitted that the words “Merry Christmas” could not be used on campus. The issue came to light only after a letter sent from the Alliance Defense Fund showcasing an agreement between the school and the ACLU to avoid litigation was broadcast on FoxNews.

Virgin Valley High School principal, Dave Wilson told the local newspaper: “We cannot promote religion in any way, shape or form. It has to be ‘happy holidays.’ ”

The Nevada ACLU denies threatening to sue the school. “Saying Merry Christmas does not create a problem for us,” Allen Lichtenstein, of the Nevada ACLU, said. “There are certain people perhaps who want to make this into a conflict where personally I don’t see where there is any need for conflict.”

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Homeowner Told to Take Down Sign on Christmas Eve

A homeowner in Washington DC participated in a Christmas decorating contest sponsored by the homeowner’s association — and then was cited in a letter delivered Christmas Eve requiring him to remove a sign in his yard bearing the words “Happy Birthday, Jesus”. The letter declared such signs in violation of the association’s ordinance against signs. The homeowner points out that the house that won the decorating contest has a three-foot oval shaped sign in their display which reads “North Pole”.

“What really bothered me was that they sent it on Christmas. I consider myself a man of faith. The sign shows to all of our neighbors what Christ means to us.”

Carol Piering, a spokeswoman for the management company, said the sign’s religious message had nothing to do with the decision to enforce the rules. “The content of the sign is not why the letter was sent,” she said, acknowledging that the warning could have been mailed on a different date. “The letter was ill-timed, and for that we absolutely apologize.”

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Feds Make Bank Remove Christmas and Religious Symbols

A small-town bank in Oklahoma said the Federal Reserve won’t let it keep religious signs and symbols on display.

Federal Reserve examiners come every four years to make sure banks are complying with a long list of regulations. The examiners came to Perkins last week. And the team from Kansas City deemed a Bible verse of the day, crosses on the teller’s counter and buttons that say “Merry Christmas, God With Us.” were inappropriate. The Bible verse of the day on the bank’s Internet site also had to be taken down.

“I don’t think there should be a problem with them displaying whatever religious symbols they want to display,” said Amy Weierman, a Perkins resident.

Specifically, the feds believed, the symbols violated the discouragement clause of Regulation B of the bank regulations. According to the clause, “…the use of words, symbols, models and other forms of communication … express, imply or suggest a discriminatory preference or policy of exclusion.”

The feds interpret that to mean, for example, a Jew or Muslim or atheist may be offended and believe they may be discriminated against at this bank. It is an appearance of discrimination.

But customers Eyewitness News 5 talked to said they aren’t buying it.

“This is just ridiculous,” said bank customer Jim Nyles. “This whole thing is just ridiculous. We all have regulatory bodies that govern us. But this is too much.”

“I think that’s absurd,” said Chelsi Holser, a bank customer. “I don’t agree with it at all. They are taking Christ out of Christmas and life.”

The bank is quietly fighting for a clearer interpretation of the clause. Officials have contacted their two U.S. legislators, Rep. Frank Lucas and Sen. Jim Inhofe, and the Oklahoma Bankers Association to help.

Red Cross Bans Christmas

Christmas has been banned by the Red Cross from its 430 fund-raising shops.

Staff have been ordered to take down decorations and to remove any other signs of the Christian festival because they could offend Moslems.

The charity’s politically-correct move triggered an avalanche of criticism and mockery last night – from Christians and Moslems.

Christine Banks, a volunteer at a Red Cross shop in New Romney, Kent, said: ‘We put up a nativity scene in the window and were told to take it out. It seems we can’t have anything that means Christmas. We’re allowed to have some tinsel but that’s it.

‘When we send cards they have to say season’s greetings or best wishes. They must not be linked directly to Christmas.

‘When we asked we were told it is because we must not upset Moslems.’

Mrs Banks added: ‘ We have been instructed that we can’t say anything about Christmas and we certainly can’t have a Christmas tree.

‘ I think the policy is offensive to Moslems as well as to us. No reasonable person can object to Christians celebrating Christmas. But we are not supposed to show any sign of Christianity at all.’

Labour peer Lord Ahmed, one of the country’s most prominent Moslem politicians, said: ‘It is stupid to think Moslems would be offended.

‘The Moslem community has been talking to Christians for the past 1,400 years. The teachings from Islam are that you should respect other faiths.’

He added: ‘In my business all my staff celebrate Christmas and I celebrate with them. It is absolutely not the case that Christmas could damage the Red Cross reputation for neutrality – I think their people have gone a little bit over the top.’

The furore is a fresh blow to the image of what was once one of Britain’s most respected charities.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-152361/The-Red-Cross-bans-Christmas.html#ixzz18NXPf9af

Oregon School Classifies Christmas Trees as Religious Symbols

In an effort to remain neutral, students at a public school district in Oregon reportedly won’t see a Christmas tree by itself, but may spot the holiday symbol alongside other religious decorations.

Ashland School District Superintendent Juli Di Chiro told the district’s school board on Monday that a committee studied the rulings of about a dozen court cases regarding school holiday displays before crafting the new guidelines, the Ashland Daily Tidings reports.

“Certainly these guidelines could be used at anytime that these celebrations could come up, but for us that mainly happens in December,” Di Chiro told the newspaper. “It’s actually called the ‘December dilemma’ that many, many schools face.”

District officials implemented the new guidelines this year following a controversy at Bellview Elementary School last December, when Principal Michelle Zundel removed a tree because a family complained that it was a religious symbol. After dozens of parents and students protested the decision, Zundel replaced the tree and allowed students to decorate it with symbols from their own religions, the newspaper reports.

According to the new guidelines, displays in public areas should “represent the diversity of the season, and should avoid symbols with patently religious meanings,” including the manger scene, menorahs, angels or the Star of David.

If a tree is displayed, it should be surrounded with “symbols from various religious backgrounds, along with secular symbols,” the guidelines state.

Di Chiro could not be immediately reached for comment on Wednesday.